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Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome in Adult Horses

Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome (EGUS) is prevalent in our equine population and can be a cause of suboptimal performance and behavioral issues. It has been estimated that approximately one to two thirds of adult horses have gastric ulcers depending on level of work and management practices.

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“EGUS”: Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome

How many of you can think back to vague signs in your horse including intermittent colic, poor performance, changes in attitude, poor hair coat or poor body condition? It may be worth looking into EGUS or Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome in your horse.

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Enteroliths: A Rock and a Hard Place

Enteroliths are one of the leading causes of severe colic in the state of California. The word enterolith is derived from the Greek terms “entero” meaning intestinal and “lith” meaning stone (Figure 1). The high incidence of enterolith formation in California is presumably due to the mineral content of our hay and water. Commonly referred to as stones, enteroliths are composed of struvite crystals which coalesce around some central object like a pebble or a small piece of wire ingested by the horse.

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Equine Colic: What to Expect

Colic. To some, it is a term that is unfortunately all together too familiar; to others, it is a word that causes fear with little understanding of what it is. While it is a situation we would all like to avoid, it is important to have a knowledge of what colic is, some of its causes and potential ways to minimize it’s occurrence, and how your veterinarian may deal with it.

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Colic in Horses: What You Should Know

The word “colic” comes from the Greeks and means “abdominal pain”. Horses are notorious for colic and are predisposed to it when compared to other species. Signs of colic include but are not limited to: being “off feed”, depressed, looking/biting at the flanks, stretching as if to urinate, kicking at the abdomen, and rolling in pain. There are many factors that predispose horses to colic.

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